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WESTERN AUSTRALIAN PIPE ORGANS

Winthrop Hall 2000
Winthrop Hall prior to organ rebuild
Photo T Bunning


Winthrop Hall
The new Trumpet Real and Organ case, 2007.

Winthrop Hall

Winthrop Hall

The organ ready for re-assembly after the 2007 rebuild

Winthrop Hall

Pedal division pipes


Name of institution University of Western Australia
Type of institution University
Street Address Stirling Highway
City Crawley
State Western Australia
Postcode
Country Australia
Name of building Winthrop Hall
Name of room Winthrop Hall
Dates of the building 1932
Architect’s and builder’s names
Special architectural features Winthrop Hall displays a grand Mediterannean style.
Sitting on the banks of the Swan River, the University of Western Australia Crawley campus is the oldest in Western Australia and among the most picturesque in the world with its grand sandstone and terracotta buildings sitting among elegant heritage-listed gardens.
Special fittings The auditorium combines stained glass windows and aboriginal motifs on the ceiling.
Other location information Winthrop Hall
Winthrop HallWinthrop Hall
Name of contact
Mailing Address
Telephone
Email
Other contact information
.
Date of previous organs None
Detail of previous organs
Dates when key work has been undertaken
Dates of any moves that have taken place
Variations from original design of organ
Information on previous organs
Information about comparable instruments to previous organs
.
Present organ
Type of installation Front gallery (shelf)
Case description Open display
Placement in room Front, central, above main stage and choir stalls
Builder's name J W Walker and Sons Ltd, Ruislip, England.
Opus number
Date of completion/installation 1965
Construction materials
Number of manuals Three (3)
Key compasses
Number of keys
Key material
Pedal compass
Number of pedals
Pedalboard type
Pedalboard material
Type of chests
Type of key action Electro-pneumatic
Type of stop action Electro-pneumatic
Couplers
Tremulants Swell, Positive and Choir
Accessories   
Console type Drawstop, detached, movable
Stop label material
Placement
General design The cost of the organ was £30,000.  It took one year to build, using eight miles of wire, and over sixty craftsmen in its construction.  The organ was designed as an instrument of the Organ Reform Movement – the fully developed principal chorus work on all manual divisions is of open toe voicing on fairly low wind pressure and the reeds are French in character.  It was one of the first of these “classical” instruments to be installed in Australia.  It is not a large scale cathedral or concert hall instrument, but depends on the character of each voice to produce its unique tone.

The original stoplist (1965) was:
GREAT
Quintaton 16'
Open Diapason 8'
Principal   8'
Spitzflute 8'
Octave   4'
Rohrflute 4'
Twelfth 2 2/3'
Fifteenth 2'
Sesquiatera 12.17 II
Mixture 19 22 26 29 IV
Trompette 8'
.
SWELL
Open Diapason 8'
Gedeckt 8'
Viola da Gamba 8'
Voix Celeste TC 8'
Gemshorn 4'
Koppelflute 4'
Fifteenth  2'
Mixture 22 26 29 33 IV
Contra Bassoon 16'
Cornopean 8'
Bassoon  8'
Clarion 4'
.
POSITIVE
Stopped Diapason 8'
Nason Flute 4'
Principal 2’
Blockflute 2’
Tierce   1 3/5’
Larigot 1 1/3’
Crummhorn  8'
Trompette 8'
Trumpet Real TC 8'
.
CHOIR
Orchestral Flute 8'
Salicional 8'
Vienna  Flute 4'
.
PEDAL
Double Open Diapason 32’
Principal 16'
Bourdon 16'
Quintaton 16' Great
Octave 8'
Bass Flute 8'
Fifteenth 4'
Octave Flute  4'
Mixture 22 26 29 III
Trombone 16'
Bassoon 16' Swell
Trumpet 8'
.
The organ had a three manual console made of Honduras mahogany, maple interior fittings, ivory keys and a fully mobile platform that could be positioned freely on the stage.  The five division organ with 47 speaking stops featured 2712 pipes  The Choir and Positive shared the bottom keyboard, having a thumb piston each for Choir ‘on’, Positive ‘on’ and Choir and Positive ‘on’.  The organ had the usual couplers for an organ of this size and had a full complement of performing aids of the day.
Playing aids
Divisions    Great, Swell, Choir, Positive, Pedal
Wind pressures General:     75mm
Contra Trombone    90mm
Trumpet Real    130mm
Stop list
GREAT
Quintaton 16' D
Open Diapason 8'
Principal   8'
Spitzflute 8'
Octave   4'
Rohrflute 4'
Twelfth 2 2/3'
Fifteenth 2'
Sesquiatera 12.17 II
Mixture 19 22 26 29 IV
Trompette 8' G
Clarion 4' New
.
SWELL
Bourdon 16' New H
Open Diapason 8'
Gedeckt 8'
Viola da Gamba 8'
Voix Celeste TC 8'
Gemshorn 4'
Koppelflute 4'
Fifteenth  2'
Mixture 22 26 29 33 IV
Contra Bassoon 16' A
Cornopean 8'
Bassoon  8' A
Clarion 4'
Tremulant
.
POSITIVE
Stopped Diapason 8'
Nason Flute 4' New
Nazard  2 2/3’
Principal 2’
Blockflute 2’
Tierce   1 3/5’
Larigot 1 1/3’
Cymbal II
Crumhorn  8'
Tremulant
Trompette 8' G
Trumpet Real 8' New
.
CHOIR
Orchestral Flute 8' New
Salicional 8'
Vox Angelica 8' New
Vienna  Flute 4'
Vox Humana 8'
New
Tremulant
.
PEDAL
Double Open Diapason 32’ B
Principal 16' B
Bourdon 16' E
Echo Bourdon 16' H
Quintaton 16' D
Octave 8' C
Bass Flute 8' E
Fifteenth 4' C
Octave Flute  4' E
Mixture 22 26 29 III
Contra Trombone 32' New F
Trombone 16' F
Bassoon 16' A
Trumpet 8' F
.
Total number of stops 56 stops
Total number of ranks 54 ranks
Total number of pipes
Dates when key work has been undertaken on current organ Tonal alterations 1978 and around 1990 F.J.Larner and Co. -
the Positive chorus work was developed further with addition of a 2 2/3 flute (made from the Nason Flute 4) and mixture, space being made for this by the removal of the Stopped Diapason, which was installed on the Choir in place of the Orchestral Flute.  The Choir swell shutters were removed.  The Trumpet Real pipes, with impressively long bell resonators projecting above the Positive division case, were also replaced with pipes thought to be more “civilised”.
During 2007, the South Island Organ Company Limited (SIOC) of Timaru, New Zealand, undertook a complete restoration of the instrument.  The actual work comprised:
1.    A comprehensive restoration and refit
2.    The six slider windchests and numerous off-note chests being completely restored according to their 1964 manufacture
3.    The 13 “schwimmer” style wind regulators and five traditional single rise regulators were completely restored ( including complete restoration and reinstatement of their unique internal springing system with new constant force springs obtained from the same supplier that supplied springs in 1963 to J W Walker – thanks to the wonders of Google!!)
4.    Complete cleaning and attention to the approximately 3000 pipes
5.    Reinstatement of the independence of the Choir and Positive divisions
6.    Reinstatement of the Choir expression shutters
7.    Completion of the tonal scheme with carefully scaled and voiced stop additions
8.    Replacement of the 1963 obsolete electrical transmission system with a modern state of the art computerised system
9.    Deepening of the organ shelf and enlarging the organ frame by 600mm to allow for improved internal access
10.    A new aluminium University crest made by artist Hans Arkeveld from the School of Anatomy and Human Biology now adorns the Positive Organ case
11.    Visually the facade of the Positive division has been subtly altered to accommodate the new UWA shield and the new display chest for the spun copper Trumpet Real pipes. This additional work was the happy outcome of a design idea and bequest by Dr Jim Rowlands who felt strongly that the original design was weak at this point.
Dates of any moves that have taken place to current organ
Information on current organ Choir and Positive share the lowest manual but Choir can now be played from the top manual through a “Choir on Swell” piston. Great and Positive key boards can be reversed so that the French keyboard layout can be used.
Comparable instruments to current organ
Current status
Assessment of organ
Other organs by this builder
Photographs Photographs by Patrick Elms
Technical documents 
General documents Restoration of the McGillivray Organ
.
Supporting information Patrick Elms (Patrick Elms & Co) and John Hargraves (South Island Organ Company Limited) have been generous with information and photographs about the organ rebuild.
The Office of Development, The University Archives and the University Theatres departments at The University of Western Australia have assisted with information and historical material.
.
Document control Original entries J R Elms, OAM, Gazetteer of Western Australian Pipe Organs, 1971, 1999,2003 and 2004.
This entry D B Duncan 28 November 2008.
Information updated D B Duncan 27 September 2010.



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